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Latest RLAB News

Below are the latest headlines for CEP and STICERD. For full coverage see the CEP News and Visitors Site and the STICERD News and Visitors Site

CBC News (Nova Scotia, Canada)
School cellphone bans raised grades says researchers

About 85 per cent of Canadian high school students have a mobile phone, but two economics researchers have concluded cellphones are distracting in class. Their research paper concludes high school students score higher marks when cellphones are banned. The research began in England when Richard Murphy was at the London School of Economics. Murphy is now an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

This article was published online by CBC (Nova Scotia, Canada) on May 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Why French school curriculum and timetable reforms forced teachers onto the streets

Article by Camille Terrier
French teachers went on strike on May 19 to voice their disapproval of two major reforms that have been proposed by Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, the French education minister. The two reforms are very different: one centres on changes to the history and language curriculum and the other on schools' autonomy to manage the organisation of teaching. Yet both have sparked criticisms from teachers, unions and French intellectuals. Reforming secondary education has emerged as a recent priority in France. The most recent results of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which rank countries around the world based on tests of 15-year-olds and released last December, highlight increasing inequalities in achievement between low and high achievers in France. More disturbing is the fact that, among OECD countries, France is one of the countries where a pupil's social background is one of the strongest predictors of his or her subsequent achievement.

This article was published online by The Conversation on May 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Camille Terrier webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

WFXG FOX 54
Study: No cell phones at school equals higher test scores

The study by the London School of Economics found a link between banning smartphones in schools and increased test scores.

This article was published online by WFXG FOX 54 on May 19, 2015
Link to article here

Also in: KPLC TV, Fox Toledo, Live 5 WCSC, WDAM-TV, MyFox Birmingham, KOBI TV 5, MyFox Memphis, UTV44

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

May 2015
LSE Research Festival

The fifth edition of the LSE Research Festival, now under the auspices of the School's Institute of Public Affairs|, offers a series of exciting public engagement events. The event has grown into a multi-event celebration of social science research and it is a key feature of the LSE calendar.

To find out more about the festival and the programme of events go to www.lse.ac.uk/researchfestival.


STICERD Morishima Lecture
Scarcity: A talk for people too busy to attend talks

Thursday 21st May 2015, 6:30- 8pm

Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

Speaker: Professor Sendhil Mullainathan

Why does poverty persist?  Why do successful people get things done at the last minute?  A single psychology--the psychology of scarcity--connects these seemingly unconnected questions. The research in our book shows how scarcity creates its own mindset. Understanding this mindset sheds light on our personal problems as well as the broader social problem of poverty and what we can do about it.  

After the success of last year's Sticerd Morishima Lecture presented by Thomas Piketty, we are proud to annnounce the next public lecture will be presented by Sendhil Mullainathan on May 21st at the LSE. This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. More details of the event can be found here.

 


Department of Social Policy Public Lecture
The Government Paternalist: nanny state or helpful friend?

Wednesday 20 May 2015, 06:30pm - 08:00pm

Old Theatre, Old Building

Speaker: Professor Sir Julian Le Grand

Play | Download: Audio, Video

Should governments save people from themselves? If someone smokes, drinks, takes hard drugs, or tries to assist in a friend's suicide, does the government have the right to intervene? If so, how? This lecture offers answers to these questions - among the most socially important of our age.

Sir Julian Le Grand is the Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. He was awarded a knighthood in the 2015 New Year's honours list for services to social science and public service.

He is the co-author of Government Paternalism: nanny state or helpful friend?