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Red Pepper
Chartism for the 21st Century: Why trade unions are backing an overhaul of Westminster

And academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE looked at the relationship between marginal seats and hospital closures between 1997 and 2005. They found “Marginality…has a significant positive impact on the number of hospitals that exist” (Bloom et. al., 2010). In other words, hospitals in safe seats are more likely to close down than those in ‘swing’ seats.


Business Wire
IFR: Robots create jobs new research

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently published a study entitled Robots at Work on the use of industrial robots in 17 developed economies between 1993 and 2007. LSE head of research, Guy Michaels, summarised the key results at a Messe Munich press conference on automatica 2018: “Productivity has improved by around 15% due to industrial robots. At the same time, the proportion of low-skilled labour dropped and pay increased slightly. Industrial robots don’t have any significant impact on the number of employees overall.

Also in:

Produktion (German)

Warum Roboter neue Jobs schaffen/Why robots create new jobs

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently investigated the use of industrial robots between 1993 and 2007 in 17 developed economies with the "Robots at Work" study. LSE research director Guy Michaels summed up the main findings at a press conference at the Automatica 2018: "Industrial robots have helped to increase productivity by around 15 percent, while at the same time reducing the share of low-skilled employment and employment Wages rose slightly, and the use of industrial robots did not significantly affect the overall workforce, "said Guy Michaels.

https://www.produktion.de/nachrichten/unternehmen-maerkte/warum-roboter-neue-jobs-schaffen-314.html

 

Blogspan Magazin

Roboter schaffen Jobs – ZEW und London School of Economics legen Studien vor

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently investigated the use of industrial robots between 1993 and 2007 in 17 developed economies with the "Robots at Work" study. At a press conference of the automatica 2018 at the Munich Trade Fair Center, LSE research director Guy Michaels summed up the most important results: "By using industrial robots, the productivity of work has improved by around 15 percent. At the same time, the share of low-skilled employment declined and wages increased slightly. The use of industrial robots shows no significant effect on the total workforce, "said Guy Michaels.

http://www.blogspan.net/presse/roboter-schaffen-jobs-zew-und-london-school-of-economics-legen-studien-vor/mitteilung/1678824/

 

Aandrijven & Besturen (Netherlands)

Werkgelegenheid in Duitsland toegenomen dankzij robots/Employment in Germany increased thanks to robots

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently published the 'Robots at Work' study on the use of industrial robots in 17 developed countries in the period 1993 to 2017. Guy Michaels, head of the LSE research team, summarized the main results of this research together at a press conference on automation at the Messe Muenchen. Michaels: "Productivity has grown by 15% thanks to industrial robots, while the share of low-skilled labor has declined and the salary has increased slightly, with industrial robots having no significant impact on the total number of employees."

https://www.aandrijvenenbesturen.nl/nieuws/algemeen/nid8317-werkgelegenheid-in-duitsland-toegenomen-dankzij-robots.html

 

OTS

Roboter schaffen Jobs – ZEW und London School of Economics legen Studien vor

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently investigated the use of industrial robots between 1993 and 2007 in 17 developed economies with the "Robots at Work" study. At a press conference of the automatica 2018 at the Munich Trade Fair Center, LSE research director Guy Michaels summed up the most important results: "By using industrial robots, the productivity of work has improved by around 15 percent. At the same time, the share of low-skilled employment declined and wages increased slightly. The use of industrial robots shows no significant effect on the total workforce, "said Guy Michaels.

https://www.ots.at/presseaussendung/OTS_20180419_OTS0004/roboter-schaffen-jobs-zew-und-london-school-of-economics-legen-studien-vor

 

Novus Light

IFR research shows: robots create jobs

The London School of Economics (LSE) recently published a study entitled Robots at Work on the use of industrial robots in 17 developed economies between 1993 and 2007. LSE head of research, Guy Michaels, summarized the key results at a Messe Munich press conference on Automatica 2018: “Productivity has improved by around 15% due to industrial robots. At the same time, the proportion of low-skilled labour dropped and pay increased slightly. Industrial robots don’t have any significant impact on the number of employees overall.”

http://www.novuslight.com/ifr-research-shows-robots-create-jobs_N8001.html


The Irish News
High costs of just missing out on a grade C in GCSE English

Pupils who narrowly fail to achieve a grade C in their GCSE English exam pay a high price, according to new research. A study from the Centre for Vocational Education Research explored what happened to young people who took the exam in 2013. Entry Through the Narrow Door: The Costs of Just Failing High Stakes Exams, was led by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela. It used data to show that pupils of the same ability had significantly different educational trajectories depending on whether or not they just passed or failed.

 


LSE Festival 2018
Five LSE Giants' Perspectives on Poverty

Speaker(s): Dr Tania Burchardt, Professor Sir John Hills, Professor Stephen P Jenkins, Professor Lucinda Platt
Chair: Professor Paul Gregg
Video, Audio recording and Slides available here

This event, held as part LSE Research Festival 2018: Beveridge 2.0, focused on Beveridge’s Giant of ‘want’. It addresses the thinking on poverty of five ‘Giants’ in the study of poverty over the last 100 years, who have been closely associated with LSE and who are themselves authors or co-authors of influential reports: Beatrice Webb, Brian Abel-Smith, Peter Townsend, Amartya Sen and Anthony Atkinson.

The event brought together current LSE academics known for their work on poverty and inequality. John Hills considers the ‘rediscovery of poverty’ marked by the publication of Brian Abel-Smith and Peter Townsend’s 1966 work on ‘The Poor and The Poorest and Tania Burchardt analysed the distinctive contribution of Amartya Sen to how we understand poverty across very different contexts. Lucinda Platt discussed Beatrice Webb’s ‘Minority Report on the Poor Laws’ of 1909 and Stephen Jenkins evaluated the significance of the Atkinson Commission’s 2015 Report on Monitoring Global Poverty to how we conceptualize and address poverty in a global context.


Postponement of the forthcoming CASE Welfare Policy Analysis Seminar
Wednesday 14th March, Monica Costa Dias Institute for Fiscal Studies

 
In the light of the UCU strike action, we have decided to postpone this event:

Wednesday 14th March, 12:45-14:00

The gender pay gap in the UK: children and experience in work

Monica Costa Dias
Institute for Fiscal Studies

Apologies for an inconvenience caused by the postponement of this event. We hope to reschedule it later in the year.

Lessons from Grenfell:
bringing together residents from multi-storey estates around the country

Following the Grenfell Tower fire in June 2017, LSE Housing and Communities were grant funded to bring together residents from multi-storey estates around the country to share their views on living in blocks of flats, document their experiences and the lessons learnt. There are many positive reasons why high-rise blocks were built and many people make secure, welcoming homes in those communities.

But the Grenfell fire disaster changed everything. It highlighted the lack of careful on-site management of high rise blocks, the poor standard of repair and upgrading, the inadequate checks and misapplied fire safety measures, the lack of clear information and guidance to tenants, the conflicting advice, and the barriers to tenants getting their worries, fears and experiences heard or acted on. The disaster also highlighted the lack of control over private lettings from Right to Buy owners converting to profitable private renting.

By gathering residents’ experiences, developing plans for estate upgrading, and collecting messages for landlords, professional bodies and government, we have been able to make an input into policy development among professionals and in government. Everyone recognises that the way social housing is run has to change and that tenants’ concerns need airing and acting upon.

Summary of the key findings 10 Lessons from the Grenfell Fire Disaster, based on feedback from a wide range of organisations and residents across the country living in and managing multi-storey housing.

Firstly a workshop for the communities and tenants was held, below are links for documents from this event:

Briefing note for lessons from Grenfell Community Think Tank

Headlines from Lessons from Grenfell Community Think Tank 30-31st October 2017

Information Pack (work-in-progress) Lessons from Grenfell Community Think Tank

A second Think Tank for professionals, landlords, policy making and residents added weight to the early findings. In all, 100 people attended. Many follow-on actions are already happening: some tower blocks have had their gas supply turned off for safety reasons; some have been evacuated; some are being stripped of expensive cladding; and tenants’ heating bills are inevitably rising as a result of insulation removal.

Briefing Note for Lessons from Grenfell Policy Think Tank

Headlines from Lessons from Grenfell: Social housing at the forefront, Policy Think Tank 4-5th December 2017

Resource Pack (work-in-progress) Lessons from Grenfell Policy Think Tank