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Latest RLAB News

Below are the latest headlines for CEP and STICERD. For full coverage see the CEP News and Visitors Site and the STICERD News and Visitors Site

The Financial Times
Britain can only walk tall if productivity is reignited

The government made three arguments for accelerated austerity. None was persuasive.
Here are three indicators of the extent to which the economy has gone ex-growth: real gross domestic product per head at the end of 2014 was much the same as at the end of 2006; real GDP per head at the end of 2014 was about 16 per cent below what it would have been if pre-crisis trends had continued; and GDP per hour was about 15 per cent below the pre-crisis trend. This productivity collapse is why employment has been so buoyant. But now that unemployment has fallen to 5.5 per cent, nearly all future growth depends on a productivity resurgence.

This article was published in The Financial Times on March 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans, John Van Reenen, CEP Election Analyses Series, March 2015.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Conversation
The gaping productivity hole in Osborne's election budget

Article by John Van Reenen
Public service spending is in for a rollercoaster ride. The implication of the Autumn Statement was that public service spending would be cut to levels not seen since 1948. Now they will be 36% of GDP - marginally above 1999-2000 (when it was 35.9%). What the chancellor didn't mention is that UK GDP per person is 16% lower than we would have expected on pre-crisis trends and the major factor is lousy productivity growth. Productivity is important because, while the chancellor can point to healthy GDP growth numbers and high employment figures, productivity (GDP per hour) is critical for long-run income growth.

This article was published by The Conversation on March 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans, John Van Reenen, CEP Election Analyses Series, March 2015.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Free Lunch: Expect a purely political Budget

What about the deficit and public finances? The best guide for those who want to get on top of things quickly before the chancellor stands up tomorrow is in a blog post and briefing paper by John van Reenen from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Both usefully go through the fiscal consolidation undertaken since 2010 (which is less than what was promised and more costly to growth).

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 17 March 2015 link to article

Related publications
Austerity: Growth Costs and Post-Election Plans John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance 2015 Election Analyses Series March 2015

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

STICERD Morishima Lecture
Scarcity: A talk for people too busy to attend talks

Thursday 21st May 2015, 6:30- 8pm

Old Theatre, Old Building, LSE

Speaker: Professor Sendhil Mullainathan

Why does poverty persist?  Why do successful people get things done at the last minute?  A single psychology--the psychology of scarcity--connects these seemingly unconnected questions. The research in our book shows how scarcity creates its own mindset. Understanding this mindset sheds light on our personal problems as well as the broader social problem of poverty and what we can do about it.  

After the success of the first Sticerd Morishima Lecture presented by Thomas Piketty in 2014, we are proud to annnounce the next public lecture will be presented by Sendhil Mullainathan on May 21st at the LSE. This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. More details of the event can be found here.

 


Department of Social Policy Public Lecture
The Government Paternalist: nanny state or helpful friend?

Wednesday 20 May 2015, 06:30pm - 08:00pm

Old Theatre, Old Building

Speaker: Professor Sir Julian Le Grand

Should governments save people from themselves? If someone smokes, drinks, takes hard drugs, or tries to assist in a friend's suicide, does the government have the right to intervene? If so, how? This lecture offers answers to these questions - among the most socially important of our age.

Sir Julian Le Grand is the Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at the LSE. He was awarded a knighthood in the 2015 New Year's honours list for services to social science and public service.

He is the co-author of Government Paternalism: nanny state or helpful friend?


CEPR
Public Economics Annual Symposium 2015

The 2015 CEPR Annual Public Economics Symposium will take place on 14-15 May at the London School of Economics. It will be hosted by STICERD and co-funded by the International Growth Centre.

The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for high-quality work in public economics and to bring together economists in the field from across Europe as well as key researchers from outside the region.

This year's symposium features a keynote talk by Professor Emmanuel Saez, UC Berkeley. The symposium will also include a number of sessions devoted specifically to the theme of "public economics and development".

The event provides a unique opportunity for researchers from different universities and countries to discuss their work in a relaxed atmosphere and to develop long-term collaborative relationships. It is also a great opportunity for young researchers to meet and discuss their work with senior economists.

For more information about this event please go to http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/_new/events/cepr/default.asp